Know the symptoms of abdominal aortic aneurysm

Image courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net

Major cause of death

Abdominal aortic aneurysms are the third leading cause of death in men over 60. They often grow in the body without symptoms or warning signs. Getting an abdominal aortic aneurysm screening is fast, painless and reliable, and you probably won’t need to do it more than once.

An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a bulge in the lower aorta — the largest artery in the human body, roughly the size of a garden hose — formed by blood pressure on a weak spot in the wall of the aorta. The wall grows thinner where it stretches, sometimes causing pain in the abdomen or chest.

In some cases, blood seeps out of the swollen area, causing intense pain and a throbbing sensation that drives the patient to the hospital. But too often, the aneurysm bursts without warning, causing internal blood loss that is fatal if not treated immediately. The symptoms of this are intense pain, rapid heart rate, low blood pressure, clamminess, dizziness, nausea, vomiting and sometimes fainting and bruising. Even if the patient is taken to a hospital right away, only half of those who suffer a burst anuerysm live longer than 30 days. It is often called the “silent killer” and “the widowmaker.”

Risk factors

Abdominal aortic anuerysms are more likely in men who smoke or used to smoke, or who have suffered an infection in the aorta. High blood pressure, psoriasis and asthma are also risk factors, and if you’ve ever had a family member suffer from an abdominal aortic aneurysm, you are also at risk. Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms is a quick, safe and painless procedure that uses ultrasound, similar to what is used for pregnant women. Small aneurysms can be treated through medication, but bigger ones need surgery. If your doctor detects an aneurysm, he or she will be able to tell you which is the best option in your case.

Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening available in Matthews, NC

In January of 2007, a federal law went into effect that made free one-time abdominal aortic aneurysm screenings available for any Medicare Part B enrollee who has a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, or who is a man between the ages 65 and 75 who has smoked at least 100 cigarettes in his lifetime. But abdominal aortic aneurysms have also been known to happen to women and younger people, so if you feel any of the symptoms and have some of the other risk factors, it might be worth getting a screening.

The Conner Family Health Clinic in Matthews, NC is an excellent place to get a screening. Dr. Conner is on call 24 hours a day and seven days a week, and abdominal aortic aneurysm screening is a part of his subscription medical practice. Schedule a screening today, and you may save your life.

 

160

Rating: 10 out of 10 (from 19 votes)

Get an abdominal aortic aneurysm screening

Image courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net

What an abdominal aortic aneurysm is

The aorta is the largest artery in the human body, about the size of a garden hose. It carries blood from the heart to the abdomen. Sometimes, a weak spot forms in the lower aorta. Blood pressure causes the wall of the aorta to swell outward and form a bulge. This bulge is an abdominal aortic aneurysm. A screening can detect it early enough that it can be treated by medication. The trouble is that since it often grows without symptoms, people who have it don’t know they need an abdominal aortic aneurysm screening.

Sometimes blood starts seeping out of the bulge, causing pain in the back or abdomen — the kind of pain no one can ignore. At this point, the aneurysm can still be repaired through surgery. If the patient is not lucky, the aneurysm bursts without warning, and the patient starts to bleed to death inside. The symptoms are intense pain, dizziness, nausea and vomiting, rapid heart rate, clamminess, low blood pressure, and sometimes fainting and bruising along the sides. Even if the patient is rushed to a hospital, only half of those who suffer a burst anuerysm live longer than 30 days. There are good reasons why the abdominal aortic aneurysm is called “the widowmaker” and “the silent killer.”

Who is at risk

According to the CDC, abdominal aortic aneurysms directly cause the deaths over ten thousand Americans a year. An abdominal aortic aneurysm screening uses ultrasound to detect the condition. It is quick, safe, painless and reliable and you will probably only need to do it once in your life. Men with high blood pressure are most likely to need an abdominal aortic aneurysm screening.

Risk is particularly high for current or former smokers, even those who smoked only for brief periods in their lives, or those who have suffered an aortic infection. According to research recently published in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, people with mild psoriasis are at roughly twice the risk of an abdominal aortic aneurysm, and the risk is even greater for those with severe psoriasis.

Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening available in Matthews, NC

In January of 2007, a federal law went into effect that made free one-time abdominal aortic aneurysm screenings available for any Medicare Part B enrollee who has a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, or who is a man between the ages 65 and 75 who has smoked at least 100 cigarettes in his lifetime.

If you are outside this age range or are not enrolled in Medicare Part B, but you want an abdominal aortic aneurysm screening, they are a part of the subscription medical practice at the Conner Family Health Clinic in Matthews, NC. Dr. Conner is on call 24 hours a day and seven days a week. Make an appointment today.

144

Rating: 9 out of 10 (from 52 votes)

A lucky warning about a silent killer

Image courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net

Abdominal aortic aneurysm warning signs

Early in March, Mr. Thomas began feeling a pulsing sensation, off and on, near his navel. He was a little over sixty, and he didn’t know it yet, but this was one of the luckiest days of his life.

Mr. Thomas was, as far as he knew, in reasonably good health. He didn’t drink much, and he had quit smoking thirty years ago and never looked back. And the pulsing didn’t feel like much, so he ignored it at first, assuming it would go away.

Instead, it got worse. It turned into a throbbing sensation like a drumbeat, backed up by a dull ache in his side and back. Every day, it got harder to work around. Finally, he decided to get a medical checkup, just in case. Since he had a subscription medical plan, it was easy to make an appointment.

Mr. Thomas described his symptoms to the doctor, who immediately ordered an ultrasound test. This was a quick, painless and safe procedure. What it uncovered, however, was anything but safe — an abdominal aortic anuerysm. The doctor prescribed an antihypertensive agent and recommended he return soon for surgery.

What an abdominal aortic aneurysm is

The aorta is an artery about the size of a garden hose, and it carries blood from the heart down into the abdomen. When a weak spot forms in the lower aorta, it swells to form an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Mr. Thomas was lucky in that the growth of the aneurysm caused him some discomfort — too often the problem develops with no symptoms at all.

Sometimes blood seeps out of the aneurysm, causing a much more intense pain. At this point, there is still time for surgery. Blood clots can also form in the area of an aneurysm and damage other organs.  But if the aneurysm explodes, the patient starts bleeding to death. The symptoms are intense pain, rapid heart rate, low blood pressure, clamminess, dizziness, nausea and vomiting. There may also be bruising along the sides. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2009, abdominal aortic aneurysms killed 10,597 people in the U.S., and contributed to the deaths of over 17,000 more. The people most likely to need an abdominal aortic aneurysm screening are men who have high blood pressure, have ever smoked or have suffered an aortic infection.

AAA screenings in Matthews, NC

In January of 2007, a federal law went into effect that made free one-time abdominal aortic aneurysm screenings available for any Medicare Part B enrollee who either has a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, or is a man between the ages 65 and 75 and has smoked at least 100 cigarettes in his lifetime. If you are outside this age range or are not enrolled in Medicare Part B, but you are interested in an abdominal aortic aneurysm screening, they are included in the subscription medical practice at the Conner Family Health Clinic in Matthews, NC. Dr. Conner is on call 24 hours a day and seven days a week. Make an appointment today.

144

Rating: 9 out of 10 (from 47 votes)

Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a time bomb

Image courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net

No symptoms, no warning, not much chance

An abdominal aortic aneurysm is one of the most dangerous health problems you can have, because it often develops without symptoms and turns into a medical emergency without warning. The aorta is an artery about the size of a garden hose which carries blood from the heart down into the abdomen. When a weak spot forms in the lower aorta, it swells and forms a bulge. This bulge is an abdominal aortic aneurysm. It is like a time bomb in the lower torso.

Sometimes blood seeps out of the bulge, causing intense, throbbing pain no one can ignore. At this point, there is still time for surgery. But too often time runs out the bulge just pops without warning, and the patient starts to bleed to death inside. The symptoms are intense pain, rapid heart rate, low blood pressure, clamminess, dizziness, nausea and vomiting. There may also be fainting and bruising along the sides. Even if the patient is taken straight to a hospital and the doctors recognize the symptoms immediately, only half of those who suffer a burst anuerysm live longer than 30 days.

Those most at risk

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that in 2009, abdominal aortic aneurysms killed 10,597 people in the U.S., and contributed to the deaths of over 17,000 more. The people most likely to need an abdominal aortic aneurysm screening are men who have high blood pressure or have suffered an aortic infection. Risk is particularly high for current or former smokers, even if they maintained the habit for less than a year. According to a study published in mid-February in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, asthma medication users are also at greater risk of abdominal aortic aneurysms, and those who have recently been diagnosed with asthma are at much greater risk of aneurysm rupture.

AAA screenings in Matthews, NC

The good news is that there are screenings available for abdominal aortic aneurysms. These screenings are quick, safe, painless and reliable, using ultrasound to detect the condition. You will probably only need to get one screening in your lifetime.

In January of 2007, a federal law went into effect that made free one-time abdominal aortic aneurysm screenings available for any Medicare Part B enrollee who either has a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, or is a man between the ages 65 and 75 and has smoked at least 100 cigarettes in his lifetime. If you are outside this age range or are not enrolled in Medicare Part B, but you are interested in an abdominal aortic aneurysm screening, they are included in the subscription medical practice at the Conner Family Health Clinic in Matthews, NC. Dr. Conner is on call 24 hours a day and seven days a week. Make an appointment today.

144

Rating: 9 out of 10 (from 13 votes)

Sudden death by abdominal aortic aneurysm

Image courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net

The killer inside- story about abdominal aortic aneurysm screening

(The following is a dramatization.)

Mr. Jackson is in his early sixties, on a drive in the country, and has no idea that he has only ten minutes left to live. A killer waits, unseen, silent, very close to him. When he bleeds to death, no one will even see the blood. The killer is an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

Mr. Jackson is in good shape and good health. He took up smoking as a teenager, but quit for good when he was thirty. His blood pressure is within reasonable limits. The worst medical problem he has had in the past ten years was that infection of the aorta he went through in his fifties. Fortunately, it responded to antibiotics. There is nothing wrong with him — except for a weak spot in the wall of his lower aorta.

The aorta is the largest artery in the human body, and carries blood from the heart to the abdomen. The weak spot in the aorta of Mr. Jackson has swelled outward, like a balloon. This is an abdominal aortic aneurysm. It grew without causing symptoms until it was too large to be treated through medication.

Any minute now, the balloon will burst, causing massive internal bleeding. Mr. Jackson will suffer rapid heart rate,  intense pain, low blood pressure, dizziness, clamminess, nausea and vomiting. There may also be fainting and bruising along the sides. In order to survive, he would have to be rushed to a hospital, and there is not one close enough. Even if he were to make it to a hospital, doctors would have to recognize the symptoms immediately in order to begin treating him. Only half of those who suffer a burst anuerysm live longer than 30 days.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that in 2009, abdominal aortic aneurysms killed 10,597 people in the U.S., and were a contributing factor in the deaths of over 17,000 more. The people most likely to suffer from them are men who have high blood pressure or have suffered an aortic infection. Risk is particularly high for current or former smokers, even those who smoked only for brief periods.

Abdominal aortic aneurysm screenings in Matthews, NC

The good news is that there are screenings available for this condition. An abdominal aortic aneurysm screening is quick, safe, painless and reliable, using ultrasound to detect the condition. You will probably only need to do it once in your life.

In January of 2007, a federal law went into effect that made free one-time abdominal aortic aneurysm screenings available for any Medicare Part B enrollee who either:

  • Has a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, or
  • Is a man between the ages 65 and 75 and has smoked at least 100 cigarettes in his lifetime.

If you are outside this age range or are not enrolled in Medicare Part B, but you would like an abdominal aortic aneurysm screening, they are a part of the subscription medical practice at the Conner Family Health Clinic in Matthews, NC. Dr. Conner is on call 24 hours a day and seven days a week. Make an appointment today.

160

Rating: 10 out of 10 (from 14 votes)

You might need an abdominal aortic aneurysm screening

Image courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net

Tens of thousands of deaths

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that in 2009, abdominal aortic aneurysms killed 10,597 people in the U.S., and were a contributing factor in the deaths of over 17,000 more. An abdominal aortic aneurysm screening is quick, safe, painless and reliable, using ultrasound to detect the condition. You will probably only need to do it once in your life.

First, you should know what an abdominal aortic aneurysm is. The aorta is the largest artery in the human body. It is about the size of a garden hose, and it carries blood from the heart to the abdomen. Sometimes, a weak spot forms in the wall of the lower aorta. Blood pressure causes the wall to swell outward, forming a bulge. This bulge is an abdominal aortic aneurysm. If detected early enough through screening, it can be treated by medication. Unfortunately, it often grows without causing symptoms.

If the patient is lucky, blood will begin to seep out of the bulge, causing intense, throbbing pain in the back or abdomen. This patient will send him or her (usually him — the condition primarily affects males) to the hospital, and there will still be time to repair the aneurysm through surgery. If the patient is not lucky, the aneurysm will explode without warning like a burst water balloon, and the patient will begin to bleed to death inside. The symptoms will be intense pain, rapid heart rate, low blood pressure, clamminess, dizziness, nausea and vomiting. There may also be fainting and bruising along the sides. Even if the patient is rushed to a hospital and the doctors recognize the symptoms immediately, only half of those who suffer a burst anuerysm live longer than 30 days.

The people most likely to need an abdominal aortic aneurysm screening are men who have high blood pressure or have suffered an aortic infection. Risk is particularly high for current or former smokers, even those who smoked only for brief periods.

Getting screened or abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in Matthews, NC

In January of 2007, a federal law went into effect that made free one-time abdominal aortic aneurysm screenings available for any Medicare Part B enrollee who has a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, or who is a man between the ages 65 and 75 who has smoked at least 100 cigarettes in his lifetime.

If you are outside this age range or are not enrolled in Medicare Part B, but you would like an abdominal aortic aneurysm screening, they are a part of the subscription medical practice at the Conner Family Health Clinic in Matthews, NC. Dr. Conner is on call 24 hours a day and seven days a week. Make an appointment today.

160

Rating: 10 out of 10 (from 93 votes)

Abdominal aortic aneurysm screenings in Matthews, NC

Image courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net

Third leading cause of death

Abdominal aortic aneurysms are the third leading cause of death in men over 60. Screening  for this disorder is fast, painless, reliable and will probably need to be done only once in your life — and doing so may save your life.

An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a problem that often grows in the body without symptoms or warning signs. It is a bulge in the lower aorta — the largest artery in the human body, roughly the size of a garden hose — formed by blood pressure acting on a weak spot in the wall of the aorta. Like the skin of a balloon, the wall grows thinner where it stretches. The thinner it grows, the more it can be deformed by blood pressure, and the more it bulges in a vicious circle. Sometimes the pressure of the swelling bulge causes pain in the abdomen or chest, but this is not always the case.

In some cases, blood will begin to seep out through tiny holes in the swollen area. The symptoms of this are intense pain and a sensation of throbbing in the back or abdomen. This is actually good news — the pain is enough to drive even the most stubborn patient to the hospital, and the aneurysm can still be repaired through surgery.

Warning signs

But too often, the aneurysm simply bursts without warning, causing major internal blood loss that will be fatal if not treated immediately. The symptoms of this are intense pain, rapid heart rate, low blood pressure, clamminess, dizziness, nausea and vomiting. There may also be fainting, and possibly bruising along the sides. Even if these symptoms are instantly recognized and the patient is taken to a hospital right away, only half of those who suffer a burst aneurysm live longer than 30 days.

Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening is more likely in men who have smoked, or who have suffered infection in the aorta. High blood pressure is also a risk factor. Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms is a quick, safe and painless procedure involving the use of ultrasound. Small aneurysms can be treated through medication, but larger ones need surgery. If your doctor detects an aneurysm, he or she will be able to tell you which is the best option in your case.

Getting an abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in Matthews, NC

If you are a man age 65 to 75, it is a good idea to get at least one abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in your lifetime — particularly if you have ever smoked. The Conner Family Health Clinic in Matthews, NC is an excellent place to get a screening. Dr. Conner is on call 24 hours a day and seven days a week, and abdominal aortic aneurysm screening is part of his subscription medical practice. Make an appointment for a screening today, and you may save your life.

160

Rating: 10 out of 10 (from 71 votes)

Get an abdominal aortic aneurysm screening

Image courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net

Abdominal aortic aneurysms screening

An abdominal aortic aneurysm screening can save your life. An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a very bland and complicated name for a medical problem that can kill you in minutes with no warning of any kind.

This is how it happens. The aorta is the largest artery in the human body — about the size of a garden hose — and it carries blood from the heart to the abdomen. Many things can happen to weaken it. Smoking can lead to hardening of the arteries, which results in weak points. Infection in the aorta, known as vasculitis, can also weaken the aortic wall.

When the wall of the aorta weakens, your own blood pressure causes it to bulge out at the weak spot, forming a balloon in your abdomen. This is the aneurysm, and men are four times as likely to suffer it as women. The pressure from the expanding aneurysm may cause pain in the chest or abdomen. Or it may not.

In the best case scenario, the balloon leaks. This causes deep pain and a throbbing sensation in the back or abdomen. This is a sign that it is time for surgery.

In the worst case scenario, the balloon pops. Severe pain, rapid heart rate, low blood pressure, clamminess, dizziness, nausea and vomiting, and possible fainting and bruising along the sides are warning signs of the sudden, massive internal bleeding that is happening now. At this point, the odds are very bad. Even when hospitals are nearby, many patients never make it to the operating table, and of those who live long enough to undergo surgery, only 50 percent survive longer than 30 days. There is a good reason why abdominal aortic aneurysms are called the Silent Killer.

The screening process

In an abdominal aortic aneurysm screening, the doctor uses ultrasound to check the shape of the aorta for unexpected bulges. This is a safe, quick and painless procedure.

If an aneurysm is detected, your doctor will discuss your treatment options with you. A small aneurysm can be treated with medication, while a larger one will need surgery.

Where to get one in Matthews, NC

If you are a man age 65 to 75, even if you have never smoked, it is recommended that you get at least one abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in your lifetime. The Conner Family Health Clinic in Matthews, NC is a very good place to get a screening. Dr. Will Conner is on call 24 hours a day and seven days a week, and abdominal aortic aneurysm screenings are a part of his subscription medical practice.

Remember that an abdominal aortic aneurysm may not give you any warning at all. Give yourself peace of mind by making an appointment to get a screening today.

144

Rating: 9 out of 10 (from 56 votes)

Image courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net

What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm screening?

An abdominal aortic aneurysm screening is an important exam that detects if the lower part of the aorta is inflated. If it is ruptured, via an aneurysm, this can cause serious, life-threatening bleeding. An aneurysm develops over time; once it is detected, doctors will monitor it in order to plan surgery as necessary. It is always better to plan surgery than wait for an emergency situation. Your Matthews, NC subscription medical practice offers abdominal aortic aneurysm screenings, and with 24/7 doctors on call, is an excellent resource for this potentially life-threatening condition.

What are the symptoms?

Abdominal aortic aneurysms are hard to detect because they usually grow slowly and without noticeable symptoms. Some aneurysms may never actually rupture, and others start small and do not grow much in size. Thus, screening is vital to help determine how fast the aneurysm is being enlarged. Some symptoms include back pain, deep and constant pain in the abdominal region or the side of the abdomen, and a pulsating sensation near the bellybutton. See your doctor as soon as possible if you experience any of the symptoms above. Adults 60 plus years old have a higher risk of developing an abdominal aortic aneurysm, particularly if it runs genetically in their family, or if they smoked. Men are more at risk than females, so healthy men ages 65 to 75 who have never smoked should still have a one-time screening at the least. Symptoms that indicate your aneurysm has actually burst, in which you should seek medical attention immediately, include: a fast pulse, shortness of breath, low blood pressure, nausea and vomiting, sweating, clamminess, dizziness, pain radiation to your back or legs, persistent and intense abdominal or back pain, and a loss of consciousness.

What are the causes?

The direct causes of an abdominal aortic aneurysm are not known, but factors like smoking, infection, and hardening of the arteries can play a role. Using cigarettes and other types of tobacco products leads to high blood pressure and atherosclerosis, which is the buildup of fatty plaques in your arteries. Atherosclerosis then causes the arteries to harden, which increases the likelihood of an aneurysm. Lastly, vasculitis, which is an infection of the aorta, can inflame and weaken the aortic wall, contributing to an aneurysm.

Conner Family Health Clinic

If you think you have an aneurysm forming, or if you meet some of the criteria for it, the Conner Family Health Clinic is a Matthews-based subscription medical practice that offers screenings. A screening for an abdominal aortic aneurysm is done via ultrasound, and as a concierge medical practice, the Conner Family Health Clinic can provide them as frequently as needed, working with your timeline. The clinic was founded in 2005, and offers superior, patient-centric, and individualized care.

160

Rating: 10 out of 10 (from 44 votes)