Start planning travel vaccinations early

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Don’t forget to get your shots

When planning a vacation or business trip abroad, we often forget about travel vaccinations. According to one study, 16% of American adult travelers needed to take the MMR vaccine before going overseas, but only half of those who needed to take it did. But getting your shots before you travel is one of the most important steps you can take to keep yourself and your loved ones healthy. Failing to do so may lead to expensive and life-threatening illnesses such as hepatitis A, yellow fever or meningitis.

The time to start planning your vaccinations is the day you decide where you want to go. The reason for this is that some of the shots need to be administered over a period of months. You should time it so that your first visit to the vaccinations clinic is at least two months before your travels begin.

First, you should consider your own health. Are you pregnant? Do you suffer from a weakened immune system? How have you reacted to previous vaccines? Are you allergic to any medications? Then you should consider your destination. The CDC’s travel advice page (wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel) is a useful source of information. There you will find out which vaccines, if any, you will be required to take for that country.

Some travel vaccination should be relatively easy to get. The MMR vaccine, for example, should be available at any primary care clinic. But if there is a risk of yellow fever or some other disease not generally seen within the United States at your destination, you will need to go to a clinic that offers specialized travel vaccinations.

Three kinds of vaccinations

There are three kinds of vaccinations: routine vaccinations, required vaccinations and recommended travel vaccinations. Routine vaccinations are the vaccines that the CDC recommends for everyone, traveling or not. Required vaccinations are those that you have to have by law in order to enter certain countries. In some countries, for example, the government will insist that you take the yellow fever vaccine and meningitis vaccine before you come. The proof of these vaccines is called the International Certificate of Vaccination, or yellow card, and you will need it in order to get past the airport. Recommended travel vaccinations, on the other hand, are just a good idea.

Travel vaccination services in Matthews, NC

The Conner Clinic in Matthews, NC is a travel vaccinations clinic with full immunization services,, offering shots for yellow fever, meningitis, hepatitis A and B, typhoid, rabies, polio and Japanese encephalitis. If you plan on going to another country any time soon, schedule an appointment as soon as you know which travel vaccinations you need.

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Three diseases you may need travel vaccinations for

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Plan travel vaccinations when going abroad

Travel vaccinations are something we often neglect. According to one study, 16% of American adult travelers needed to take the MMR vaccine, but only half of those who needed to take it did. But getting your shots before you travel is one of the most important steps you can take to keep yourself and your loved ones healthy. The best time to begin work on your vaccination schedule is as soon as you know what country you are going to go to. At the Traveler Information Center of the CDC Web site, you can find out which vaccines, if any, you will be required to take for that country.

Three diseases to beware of

Hepatitis A is most often found in developing countries with bad sanitary conditions and low levels of hygiene. Ironically, in these places the disease rarely takes the form of epidemics, because most people are infected with it in early childhood and are thereafter immune. However, if you have no immunity it is still possible for you to contract the virus from them.

The first symptoms of hepatitis A appear two to six weeks after infection. They are sometimes mistaken for influenza, and include fatigue, fever, nausea and loss of appetite, followed by jaundice and diarrhea. Symptoms usually appear in adults, but not in children.

Yellow fever is mostly found in tropical parts of South America and Africa. It is spread by mosquito bite, not through person-to-person contact. As with hepatitis A, the first symptoms can be mistaken for the flu: they include headaches, muscle pains, nausea, chills and fever. After this comes the remission period. However, in 15 to 25 percent of cases, viral hemorrhagic fever sets in which kills half of those who contract it.

Bacterial meningitis is most common in Brazil, India and western and central Africa. The initial symptoms in adults are headaches and rigidity of the neck. If properly treated, the risk of death from bacterial meningitis is less than 15 percent, but over 300,000 people died of it in 2013.

Getting travel vaccinations in Matthews, NC

Once you know which vaccines you should take, the next step is to find a travel vaccinations clinic in your area, where experts can help you set up a schedule that will have you fully immunized in time for your trip. You should make your first visit at least two months before you begin traveling. The Conner Clinic in Matthews, NC specializes in this service, offering vaccinations for yellow fever, meningitis, hepatitis A and B, typhoid, rabies, polio and Japanese encephalitis, along with routine vaccinations such as the measles shot and annual flu shots. If you plan on going to another country any time soon, find out which vaccinations you need and make an appointment today.

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Recommended travel vaccinations are recommended

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The Williamses plan a vacation

(Note: The following is a dramatization.)

Not long after arriving in the Charlotte area, the Williams family began planning an overseas vacation. Having just gone through a month in which absolutely everything went wrong, they decided to look into travel vaccinations. Their family doctor advised them to start looking up what sort of vaccines they would need as soon as they had settled on a destination — or sooner, if they already had possibilities in mind, since some vaccines needed to be given months in advance.

Mrs. Williams checked the CDC Web site for the countries they were considering visiting. She found that if they were going to Brazil, it was recommended that they get shots for hepatitis A (and the hepatitis B vaccine was labeled “consider”). Depending on where they were going within Brazil, they might also need shots for rabies and yellow fever, and antimalarial medication. If they went to Italy or Norway, hepatitis A and B were both labeled “consider,” but rabies was less of a risk unless they started exploring caves. If they chose Japan, hepatitis A and B were both labeled “consider,” and, depending on how long they stayed, getting a shot for Japanese encephalitis was either “consider” or recommended. She wasn’t sure what the CDC meant by “consider,” but after the month that just went by she wasn’t going to ignore their recommendations.

Travel vaccinations

According to one study, 16% of American adult travelers needed to take the MMR vaccine, but only half of those who needed it took it. Getting your shots before you travel is one of the most important steps you and your family can take to stay healthy. Shots against water- and food-borne illnesses such as hepatitis A are particularly important in many parts of the world. At the Traveler Information Center of the CDC Web site, you can find out which vaccines, if any, you will be required to take for that country. You can also learn which travel vaccines are recommended but not required.

Getting vaccinated for travel in Matthews, NC

Once you know which vaccines you should take, the next step is to find a travel vaccinations clinic in your area, where experts can help you set up a schedule that will have you fully immunized in time for your trip. You should make your first visit at least two months before you begin traveling. The Conner Clinic in Matthews, NC specializes in this service, offering vaccinations for yellow fever, meningitis, hepatitis A and B, typhoid, rabies, polio and Japanese encephalitis, along with routine vaccinations such as the measles shot and annual flu shots. If you plan on going to another country any time soon, find out which vaccinations you need and make an appointment today.

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Rating: 10 out of 10 (from 58 votes)

Travel vaccinations are a wise precaution

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Not just Zika you need to worry about

By now, we have all heard the horror stories about the Zika virus and its invasion of Central and South America. But if you are planning a trip abroad, you should know that there are other health threats — diseases which, unlike Zika, you can defend yourself against with travel vaccinations.

The remarkable thing is how few people think to do this. According to one study, 16% of American adult travelers needed to take the MMR vaccine, but only half of those who needed it took it. Early last year, 29 Americans fell ill from an outbreak of hepatitis A in Mexico. Getting your shots before you travel is one of the most important steps you can take to keep you and your family healthy. Shots against water- and food-borne illnesses such as hepatitis A are particularly important in many parts of the world.

Travel vaccinations fall into three categories: routine vaccinations, recommended travel vaccinations and required travel vaccinations. Routine vaccinations are the vaccines that the CDC advises everyone to get whether they are traveling or staying home. Recommended travel vaccinations are those the CDC recommends for those going to a specific destination. Required travel vaccinations are those that you must have, by law in order to enter certain countries. In some countries, the government will insist you take the yellow fever vaccine and meningitis vaccine before you come. You will need the International Certificate of Vaccination, or yellow card, to prove you have taken them.

The best time to begin work on your vaccination schedule is as soon as you know what country you are going to go to. At the Traveler Information Center of the CDC Web site, you can find out which vaccines, if any, you will be required to take for that country. You can also learn which travel vaccines are recommended but not required. Some of these vaccines need to be given in two to three doses over the course of several months. This is why planning ahead is so important.

Travel vaccinations in Matthews, NC

Once you know which vaccines to take, the next step is to find a travel vaccinations clinic in your area, where experts can help you set up a schedule that will have you fully immunized in time for your trip. You should make your first visit at least two months before you begin traveling. The Conner Clinic in Matthews, NC specializes in this lab service, offering vaccinations for yellow fever, meningitis, hepatitis A and B, typhoid, rabies, polio and Japanese encephalitis, along with routine vaccinations such as the measles shot and annual flu shots. If you plan on going to another country any time soon, find out which vaccinations you need and make an appointment today.

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Rating: 10 out of 10 (from 46 votes)

A tale of vacations in two cities

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What not to forget when planning a trip

(The following are dramatizations.)

The Smith family had been planning to spend the holidays in Rio for the past year. They booked their flight well in advance, found a hotel with a good reputation in a fairly safe neighborhood, bought travelers insurance, and generally did everything they could to make sure their vacation would be both safe and fun. But there was one little detail they forgot — travel vaccinations.

The vacation itself went well. They enjoyed the beach, tried some local cuisine… there were health warnings in the local newspapers, but the Smiths did not go on vacation to read newspapers. They also did not read Portuguese.

The trouble started a couple of weeks after they got home. The day their children began the new semester, Mr. and Mrs. Smith began to feel nauseous. For the first time, their children were able to finish dinner but they themselves could not. The next morning, both of them were running a fever and were almost too weak to get out of bed. They struggled their way to the nearest hospital, where their doctor informed them that they were suffering from hepatitis A. He also said it was quite likely their children were also infected, but were not showing symptoms, so they should stay home from school — assuming they had not already caused an epidemic. Mr. and Mrs. Smith both had to use all their sick days to recover while their ten-year-old son suddenly had to learn how to cook for a family of four.

The Jones family, planning their vacation in Mumbai, took all the precautions the Smith family took, plus one more. They checked the CDC Web site to see what vaccinations were recommended, and got shots against hepatitis A and typhoid. They had a very enjoyable vacation, at one point riding on the back of an elephant. A couple of weeks after they returned home, nothing happened.

Immunization services in Matthews, NC travel vaccinations

The best time to begin planning your vaccination schedule is as soon as you know where you plan to go. At the Traveler Information Center of the CDC Web site, you can find out which vaccines, if any, you will be required to take, and which ones are recommended for your destination. Some of these need to be given in two to three doses over the course of several months.

Once you know which vaccines to take, the next step is to find a travel vaccinations clinic in your area. You should make your first visit to this clinic at least two months before you begin traveling. The Conner Clinic in Matthews, NC specializes in this service, offering vaccinations for yellow fever, meningitis, hepatitis A and B, typhoid, rabies, polio and Japanese encephalitis. If you plan on going to another country any time soon, find out which travel vaccinations you need and schedule an appointment today.

144

Rating: 9 out of 10 (from 62 votes)

If going abroad, get travel vaccinations

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Plan your vaccinations when you start planning your trip

Travel vaccinations are something we often forget about when planning a trip to another country. According to one study, 16% of American adult travelers needed to take the MMR vaccine, but only half of those who needed to take it did. But getting your shots before you travel is one of the most important steps you can take to keep yourself and your loved ones healthy. Early in 2015, 29 Americans fell ill from an outbreak of hepatitis A in Mexico. Travel vaccines protect against life-threatening diseases not often seen in Matthews, NC, but sadly common in many parts of the world. Getting vaccinated before you travel is a precaution worth taking.

The best time to begin work on your vaccination schedule is as soon as you know what country you are going to go to. At the Traveler Information Center of the CDC Web site, you can find out which vaccines, if any, you will be required to take for that country. You can also learn which travel vaccines are recommended but not required for your destination — see below for details. Some of these vaccines need to be given in two to three doses over the course of several months. This is why planning ahead is so important.

There are three kinds of travel vaccinations: routine vaccinations, required travel vaccinations and recommended travel vaccinations. Routine vaccinations are the vaccines that the CDC recommends for everyone, traveling or not. Required travel vaccinations are those that you have to have, by law in order to enter certain countries. In some countries, for example, the government will insist that you take the yellow fever vaccine and meningitis vaccine before you come. The proof of these vaccines is called the International Certificate of Vaccination, or yellow card, and you will need it in order to get past the airport. Recommended travel vaccinations, on the other hand, are just a good idea.

Travel vaccinations in Matthews, NC

Once you know which vaccines to take, the next step is to find a travel vaccinations clinic in your area. This is a clinic where experts can help you set up a schedule that will have you fully immunized in time for your trip. You should make your first visit to this clinic at least two months before you begin traveling. The Conner Clinic in Matthews, NC specializes in this service, offering vaccinations for yellow fever, meningitis, hepatitis A and B, typhoid, rabies, polio and Japanese encephalitis, as well as routine vaccinations such as the measles shot and annual flu shots. If you plan on going to another country any time soon, find out which travel vaccinations you need and schedule an appointment today.

160

Rating: 10 out of 10 (from 47 votes)

Before you leave Matthews, NC, get travel vaccinations

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Staying safe abroad

Travel vaccinations are something we sometimes forget about when planning a vacation or business trip to another country. We go abroad to visit distant shores, meet new people, try new things and see world-famous landmarks with our own eyes, not to visit the hospital. A study was just released which shows that more than half of Americans who were recommended to get measles shots before traveling did not do it.

But getting your shots is one of the most important steps you can take to keep yourself and your loved ones healthy. Not every place is as safe as Matthews, NC, and travel vaccines protect against life-threatening diseases found in many parts of the world. Early in 2015, 29 Americans fell ill because of an outbreak of hepatitis A in Mexico. Getting vaccinated before you travel is a precaution worth taking.

Travel vaccinations you may need

When it comes to travel vaccines, there are three kinds: routine vaccinations, required travel vaccinations and recommended travel vaccinations. Routine vaccinations are the vaccines the CDC recommends for everyone, traveling or not.

Required travel vaccinations are those that you must have in order to enter certain countries. In some countries, for example, the government will insist that you take the yellow fever vaccine and meningitis vaccine before coming. The proof of these vaccines is called the International Certificate of Vaccination, or yellow card, and you will need it in order to enter. Recommended travel vaccinations, on the other hand, are simply a good idea.

The best time to begin planning your vaccination schedule is as soon as you know where you plan to go. At the Traveler Information Center of the CDC Web site, you can find out which vaccines, if any, you will be required to take. You can also learn which travel vaccines are recommended for your destination. Some of these vaccines need to be given in two to three doses over the course of several months. This is why planning ahead is so important.

Immunization services in Matthews, NC

Once you know which vaccines to take, the next step is to find a travel vaccinations clinic in your area. This is a clinic where experts can help you set up a schedule that will have you fully immunized in time for your trip. You should make your first visit to this clinic at least two months before you begin traveling. The Conner Clinic in Matthews, NC specializes in this lab service, offering vaccinations for yellow fever, meningitis, hepatitis A and B, typhoid, rabies, polio and Japanese encephalitis, as well as routine vaccinations such as the measles shot and annual flu shots. If you plan on going to another country any time soon, find out which travel vaccinations you need and schedule an appointment today.

160

Rating: 10 out of 10 (from 50 votes)

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Stay healthy abroad after travel vaccinations

Travel vaccinations should be at the top of your checklist of things to do before international travel. Make sure your passport is up to date, your bags are packed, and that all your vaccines are current. Not only should you be current with your U.S. vaccines, make sure you have been inoculated against life-threatening diseases found outside the U.S.

At Conner Clinic in Matthews, NC, we offer all travel vaccinations required for international travel. Just like the MMR shot you got when you were going to school for the first time, these immunizations will protect you against dangerous diseases. If you have plans for international travel, make sure you know what immunizations are required and which are recommended. The old saying that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure explains just why these inoculations are so important – diseases like polio can be prevented, but not cured.

Plan ahead for your travel vaccinations because the delivery system of certain vaccines takes time to work in your system. Inoculation against yellow fever, for instance, is often a requirement for international travel. It requires 2-3 doses administered 28 days or so apart. Our office in Matthews, NC offers a yellow fever vaccine, among many other immunizations. A few that we also offer are: Meningitis, Rabies, Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, Polio, Typhoid and Japanese Encephalitis.

Travel safely with careful preparation

These diseases can be prevented with travel vaccinations and a bit of planning. There are other diseases, though, that inoculations haven’t been developed for. Make sure to spend time with a skilled physician to learn about preventative measures you can take while traveling abroad. Some diseases that can be avoided are Malaria, HIV, Worms, and STDs. Our clinic in Matthews, NC can also prescribe medications to help with some common health issues people face when on the road.

Some difficulties travelers face when leaving the country aren’t necessarily life-threatening, but they can be in a developing country where access to medical care may be far away or hard to find. Without immediate access to medical care, some routine health concerns can be dangerous. Even with quality health care, certain issues can change a fun adventure into a recovery trip. Make sure to guard yourself and your family against these difficulties. A few things our office can help with are travelers’ diarrhea, motion sickness, and even jet lag.

Some basic preventative care can transform what might be a disastrous trip into a meaningful and fun adventure. There are many preparations necessary for international travel, so start planning early. Once you decide to leave the country, make sure to include a trip to Conner Clinic in Matthews, NC for travel vaccinations.  When you adventure, adventure safely.

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Rating: 9 out of 10 (from 36 votes)

Travel vaccinations and standard vaccinations in Matthews, NC

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What are travel vaccinations?

Travel vaccinations protect you against viruses specific to certain regions abroad. It is recommended that you receive the yellow fever vaccination before traveling to Africa or South America. You sh

ould receive the shot six weeks or earlier before your trip, but no later than two weeks before your trip. Your Matthews, NC subscription medical practice offers both travel and standard vaccinations. Your doctor may ask you about your destination, activities planned, the length of the trip, your current health, any risks involved with the trip, and prior immunizations. Other travel vaccinations include Japanese encephalitis and poliomyelitis.

Standard vaccinations and allergy testing

Vaccinations are a vital part of your everyday health because they protect you against potentially life-threatening viruses. Standard vaccinations include polio, meningitis, measles, mumps, typhoid, varicella, pertussis, diphtheria, hepatitis A and B, and chickenpox. These are all administered at different schedules. Some, like the flu shot, are given annually because the strain changes year after year. Others, like tetanus, are usually administered during childhood, with booster shots every ten years. Gardasil, which is the vaccine for HPV, is administered as three shots over several months. Vaccinations are part of the annual physical, as well as specific physicals for immigration, sports, and university. Your Matthews, NC subscription medical practice also offers allergy and tuberculosis testing. They have an in-house lab and phlebotomist, as well as a pharmacy for same-day turnaround. Pharmacy staff members are experts in drug interactions and other vital information regarding your prescriptions. If it is your first time at the practice, bring a copy of your past vaccinations so staff know what you are missing.

Conner Family Health Clinic

The Conner Family Health Clinic is located in Matthews, NC and offers numerous benefits to its patients. As a subscription medical practice, individuals pay for better quality service. This includes doctors on call 24/7, mental health screening, wellness and nutrition counseling, same-day and next-day appointments, treatment for minor to moderate injuries, family planning, an HCG weight loss program, Botox treatments, and abdominal aortic aneurisms. With a state-of-the-art facility and online concierge system, diagnostic testing and reporting is far superior, and patients can track their information virtually. Conner Family Health Clinic is a member of the nationally recognized Hallmark Physician Group. Dr. Conner founded the clinic in January of 2005. He finished medical school in 1996 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and his residency in Asheville. He worked in eastern North Carolina at a community health clinic for two years, treating migrant farm workers, and also practiced medicine in Haiti, Guatemala, and Africa. The Conner Family Health Clinic excels in individualized, patient-focused care, from travel vaccinations to standard vaccinations and beyond.

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Rating: 9 out of 10 (from 10 votes)